LISTEN > DJ Spooky (aka Paul Miller) and Beth Ferguson on the Vanuatu Pacifica Foundation

djspooky

[Photo via DJ Spooky on Twitter]

It’s art meets music with an enviro-consciousness, as Paul D. Miller – better known by his stage name DJ Spooky – and eco-designer Beth Ferguson of Sol Design Lab talk about the Vanuatu Pacifica Foundation: the new iniative they’re both involved in, which is all about sustainability and finding new ways to creatively tackle climate change.

LISTEN TO THE PODCAST (24min)

James Russell: The Agile City.

Earth House by Ying-Chun Hsieh

- from video.google.com

The other OPEC: Orange Peel Exploitation Company

So why not use one of mother nature’s natural waste products—say, orange peels—as the raw material for biofuels and other petroleum-derived products? A chemist at the University of York in the United Kingdom has piloted a technique to do just that. Using high-powered microwaves, James Clark has figured out how to capture gas from fruit peels that can be converted into a variety of useful materials, from plastics to ethanol.

- from good.is

Plumen’s cool twisty CFL light bulb

Media_httpwwwdesignbo_riawf

- from designboom.com

Social enterprise + renewable resources = Bambike

- from bambike.com

Bryan McClelland has created the BamBike, a bicycle made out of bamboo, made by local artisans in the Phillipines.

Rapidly-regenerating bamboo crops are one of the best renewable resources in the world. They’re getting ready to ship internationally this year, so start saving now, and get ready to see a new kind of fixie appearing on your block…

Dohyung Kim & Sewon Oh’s 1 Litre Faucet #design cuts #waste, increases awareness of #water use

- from design you trust

Now here’s a great idea: a design that limits the amount of water released in one blast, to make you more conscious of how much water you need, and how much you waste. Can you believe a tap dispenses 6 litres of water in 30 seconds? A classy design that will change the way you think about water use every day.

It’s so perfect for a drought-afflicted country like Australia that it should be standard in every new development.

to do: get (or #build) a sprouter… maybe some eggshells and cartons will do the trick? #rawfood #DIY

- from heartanddesign.blogspot.com

Wind Turbine Bridge Transforms Italian Viaduct Into Public Space

A bridge that repurposes abandoned viaducts, produces energy AND looks futuristically sleek? Yes, it can be true, and it is Italy’s proposed Wind Turbine Viaduct called “Solar Wind.” Southern Italy is dotted with unused viaducts, and rather than spending $50 million to tear them down, town officials near Calabria held a competition called “Solar Park South,” open to designers and engineers asking them to come up with an environmentally conscious way to re-use the existing structures.

Solar Wind, conceived by the design team of Francesco Colarossi, Giovanna Saracino and Luisa Saracino, has an abundance of green benefits. Using the space between the viaduct, the team proposed installing 26 wind turbines, which would produce 36 million kilowatt hours of electricity per year!

Additionally, the roadway across the bridge would be densely lined with solar cells coated in clear plastic, producing another 11.2 million kilowatt hours. Much like New York’s Highline, but on a much more grandiose scale, the entire viaduct itself would be turned into a promenade and park. Drivers may pull off to take in gorgeous coastal views, solar powered greenhouses would be installed along the bridge, creating an ultra-fresh farmer’s market.

The entire structure is like a green Utopia, repurposing abandoned structures, producing a combined 40 million kilowatt hours of electricity (that is enough to power 15,000 homes), while creating a chance to take in the surrounding panoramic views, and buy the freshest of produce! Sounds much better than merely tearing down the old viaducts.

Mike Daisey on Apple: “It is irresponsible not to consider the circumstances in which a beautiful thing is designed. That is part of the design itself.”

“There are no personal electronics that are made in a humane fashion, by any of the major manufacturers, or any of the minor ones. There’s nothing I could recommend people switch their buying decisions to today. Everything we need to do begins with changing the circumstances under which the things are made, so we can finally get to the point where the companies realise the public are awake enough to even care about something like a sweatshop-free label on electronics.”

- from Techcrunch

"Recyclicity": Dutch House Built From Salvaged Billboards and Umbrellas

Unlike most projects that start with a design, Villa Welpeloo started with a heap of scrap materials sourced locally at factories and warehouses. The team also used Google Earth to find abandoned buildings and lots near the building plot in Enschede, The Netherlands that may contain useful materials. As a result, the home’s framing comes courtesy of steel taken from abandoned machinery in a textile mill. The exterior is clad with boards salvaged from 600 cable reels that were first heat-treated by a process called Plato to weatherize them. The cladding’s clean lines do not betray the humble origins of these materials.

Inside is a treasure trove of interesting reuse — advertising signs are transformed into cabinets that reveal their origin when a drawer is opened. The architects asked for people in the town to drop off their broken umbrellas, whose spokes were transformed into low-voltage lighting.

- from inhabitat.com

wrapper chair

- from designboom

ZERI Foundation: The Blue Economy

Multipurpose Wrapping Cloth Helps To Reduce Household Waste – PSFK

- from psfk.com

CHOICE guide to ethical investing

  • Most ‘ethical’ and ‘sustainable’ funds in Australia invest in big uranium mining companies such as BHP Billiton and Rio Tinto. Funds justify this on the basis that the uranium is used for nuclear energy, not weapons, or that the companies chosen get a limited proportion of their overall revenue from uranium, or that they have good environmental, social or corporate governance performance.
  • A number of sustainable funds invest in companies that have direct involvement in gambling. For example, some funds invest in Macquarie Bank, which has gaming joint ventures with Tattersalls in the UK and Publishing and Broadcasting (PBL).
  • Until recently, BT Financial Group’s Australian Sustainability Share Fund invested in PBL and poker machine producer Aristocrat Leisure. (The fund doesn’t currently hold those stocks, and BT also offers an ‘ethical’ fund that avoids investing in gambling, tobacco and companies that mine uranium for weapons manufacture. See Table 1 in Funds compared).
  • Sustainable Asset Management invests in Tabcorp and cigarette giant British American Tobacco, and its investment approach means that no legal industry (including, for example, armaments) is off limits.
  • - from choice.com.au

    Bio | Daniel Goleman

    Working as a science journalist, Goleman reported on the brain and behavioral sciences for The New York Times for many years. His 1995 book, Emotional Intelligence (Bantam Books) was on The New York Times bestseller list for a year-and-a-half; with more than 5,000,000 copies in print worldwide in 30 languages, and has been a best seller in many countries.

    Goleman’s latest book is Ecological Intelligence: How Knowing the Hidden Impacts of What We Buy Can Change Everything. The book argues that new information technologies will create “radical transparency,” allowing us to know the environmental, health, and social consequences of what we buy. As shoppers use point-of-purchase ecological comparisons to guide their purchases, market share will shift to support steady, incremental upgrades in how products are made – changing every thing for the better. Social Intelligence: The New Science of Human Relationships, was published in 2006.

    SRD CHANGE 09: About

    SRD Change is a unique exhibition of graduate sustainable design that often directly challenges conventional expectations. Exhibits are selected from a diverse range of design areas from all of Sydney's top Universities. They feature innovative visual and 3D works, multimedia and even high fashion garments. Held annually since 2004 with healthy annual visitor numbers, we have plans in place to promote our exhibition to an even wider audience.

    DESIS NETWORK | Design for social innovation and sustainability

    DESIS is a network of schools of design and other schools, institutions, companies and non-profit organizations interested in promoting and supporting design for social innovation and sustainability. It is a light, no-profit organization, conceived as a network of partners collaborating in a peer-to-peer spirit.It is articulated in several DESIS-Local (that are sub-networks within a specified local area). DESIS-International is therefore the framework where the different DESIS-Local coordinate themselves and where some global initiatives are taken.
    DESIS-China aims to actively support design initiatives and projects in the field of design for social innovation and sustainability in China. That is, in the fields of the ecological reconversion of production and consumption systems, the social construction of services, and the balanced development of local areas. (more)

    Good Design Exhibition 2009 at Tokyo Midtown Design Hub

    This year, the Good Design Award has conducted user-conscious screenings "from the viewpoint of near-future citizens," for users are not only the recipients of products and services, but also the ones who have the potential to enhance their values. In addition, Frontier Design Award has been newly established this year, with the purpose of promoting designs that are pregnant with ideas for future lifestyles.

    On view at the Good Design Exhibition 2009 are about 80 works, centering on special award-winning pieces honored with the Good Design Gold Prize. This exhibition aims to share with the audience the fascination and possibilities of creative future-oriented design by disseminating each designer's message and important design points that have the power to appeal to our society at large.

    Good Design Exhibition 2009 at Tokyo Midtown Design Hub

    This year, the Good Design Award has conducted user-conscious screenings "from the viewpoint of near-future citizens," for users are not only the recipients of products and services, but also the ones who have the potential to enhance their values. In addition, Frontier Design Award has been newly established this year, with the purpose of promoting designs that are pregnant with ideas for future lifestyles.

    On view at the Good Design Exhibition 2009 are about 80 works, centering on special award-winning pieces honored with the Good Design Gold Prize. This exhibition aims to share with the audience the fascination and possibilities of creative future-oriented design by disseminating each designer's message and important design points that have the power to appeal to our society at large.

    Public voting now open in Green Life – Netizens Choice Awards for sustainable design. Closing Nov 15 2009

    green life – netizens choice awards. the 7 grand awards have been notified on september 21, 2009
    the international jury distributed 35.000 USD, see the results here

    tell us what you like
    after a month-long open nomination process, public voting for
    designboom readers has started for the 'green life' shortlisted entries.
    let us know, based on your vision and experiences,
    what you'd like to see ranked as top 3 netizen award winners.
    designboom encourages you to vote for your favorite contestants.

    through your vote, you will generate an alternative results' page.
    the entry with the highest rating will be listed as first.
    you as readers can see how many votes each project has received.
    you are given a maximum of 10 votes for each competition.
    before voting you need to be registered.

    deadline for voting is november 15th, 2009